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I’m excited to announce the opening of our Palo Alto pop-up shop this Saturday, November 10th. This will be our fourth year with a physical shop for the holidays… and I’d venture to say, it is our best shop yet! The last week has been a flurry of painting, unpacking, and putting the final touches on our new space at Town & Country Village. We’ve already had a number of curious passers-by come in, look around, and tell us they’re anxious for our actual opening day. Personally, I’m looking forward to having everything set up well before Thanksgiving and getting to talk with customers about handmade and handpainted ceramics as they discover the perfect gift for loved ones and themselves.

This year the shop is once again at Town & Country Village in Palo Alto, but we’re now in the beautiful Suite 10, located between Cold Stone Creamery and the UPS Store, across from LuLu’s Mexican Restaurant and Kara’s Cupcakes. I am already enjoying the many delicious offerings of my neighbors! Here’s a map so you can find us.

Starting this weekend, the shop will be open Monday-Saturday, from 10 am to 7 pm and Sunday, from 11 am to 6 pm. Follow us on Facebook or subscribe to the newsletter to find out about upcoming events (we’ll be having a few wine tastings and at least one holiday bash), flash sales, and other fun (like new pieces debuting from Mexico) in the coming weeks. Hope to see you soon!

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Sometimes I get new pieces and I’m tempted just to hold onto them myself. The new rooster pitchers and cream and sugar sets from Gorky Gonzalez are definitely in that category. Given the popularity of Gorky’s salt & pepper sets, I was thrilled on my last buying trip to Mexico to see more animal additions for the table in the form of some useful feathered friends. These owls and roosters are definitely a fun addition to any home, lending charm to your kitchen counter, tabletop, or afternoon tea service.

I love the owl creamer’s huge green eyes ringed in yellow. The handpainted detailing of feathers and feet give this little owl lots of personality, making it the ideal addition to any cream and sugar set. The small owl pitcher is another newcomer to the collection. Bigger than the creamer, its angles and colorful patterning almost feel art deco in shape and line, particularly in the clever construction of the stylized beak as a spout. Use either of these owls as a wise addition to the breakfast table or for afternoon coffee and tea; they also look great as a little accent vase for a small bouquet of wildflowers.

Besides the new owls, the new one of a kind rooster sugar bowl is another great addition for anyone who loves roosters. The comb comes off as the lid, and the vibrant colors compliment other pieces in Gorky’s collection, particularly the rooster and chicken salt and pepper shakers. Pair this sugar bowl with a rooster creamer to create your own one of a kind cream and sugar set that’s sure to get compliments whenever you use it, especially when paired with the brightly colored Gogo mugs.

Judging by how people love Gorky’s salt and pepper shakers, I don’t expect to hold onto these new arrivals for long. I think they would make excellent gifts, particularly for a housewarming or hostess present (or even just for yourself). Like these new creamer sugar set pieces or the salt and pepper shakers? Leave a comment and let us know which are your favorites.

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Black and white is perhaps the most versatile color combination out there. From modern design to rustic country décor, these basic colors create spaces that are full of personality and depth. After our zigzag black and white ceramic wine bottle holder was featured on the cover of the September issue of HGTV magazine I’ve been thinking more about how to use black and white effectively in kitchen décor. It’s the perfect counterpoint for color and so much more!

Here are some ideas to help you find the best ways to use black and white in your kitchen:

Let colors rule. Black and white looks the most striking when paired with vibrant colors. Cheerful cabinets, walls, and countertops create a backdrop for your black and white kitchen décor that prevents things from looking flat and lifeless. Lighter shades are equally effective (powder blue and pale yellow are some personal favorites), but make sure there’s enough richness in the base tone of your paint to avoid a washed-out, blah effect.

Find white dishes with character. Plain white plates are boring, so choose white dishes that have something unique about them. Textured glazes and unusual shapes are great ways to pack some punch with your white serving platters.

This white plate with cut-out handles is the perfect example with black clay that shows just around the edges, giving an unexpected softness to the piece. Similarly, a white bowl becomes playful with decorative fluting around the edges.

 

Who said white dishes had to be basic?

 

Embrace touches of modern design. Not everyone wants a kitchen that feels like a futuristic spaceship. But that doesn’t mean that you should reject contemporary décor accents like curtains, countertop accessories, or vases. Mixing in a little of the modern gives any kitchen décor a definite edge. Take Gogo’s white espresso cup and saucer or Richard Esteban’s carved black vase; these pieces have timeless appeal with a distinctly modern feel.

Or try a graphic black and white ceramic wine bottle holder that becomes an appealing utensil holder and plays up your other colorful accents.

What ways do you incorporate black and white into your kitchen décor or dishware? Leave a comment and let us know!

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Work schedules are very different in Europe and the United States, especially when it comes to vacation time. It’s very common for businesses to close for weeks in the summer or even the entire month of August. What does this have to do with Spanish ceramics? Well, let’s just say that due to vacation schedules, my order from Ceramica Valenciana (a famous maker of Spanish ceramics and one of the reasons I was inspired to start Emilia Ceramics in the first place) now looks like it will arrive in fall, not summer. (Who am I kidding… let’s just hope it’s here by Christmas!)

But even though I don’t have any pieces by Ceramica Valenciana in stock yet doesn’t mean I can’t give you a sneak peak at what to expect in a few months. The full name of Ceramica Valenciana is La Cerámica Valenciana de José Gimeno and it’s been in business since 1925. This family-run business makes a full range of Spanish ceramics. Most famous for tiles (known as Azulejos in Spain) and reproductions of traditional pieces from the 18th century, they also do many modern pieces, from lamps and canisters to dishes and bowls. What I love about their work is how it combines tradition, innovation, and a fun Spanish spirit.

The quality work at Ceramica Valenciana hasn’t gone unnoticed. They won the Manises “Qualitat i Disseny” award in 1994, 1997, and 2000; the Alfa Gold Award in 1980, 2000, and 2002; and the NOVA for craft (the highest award from the Generalitat Valenciana) in 2006. They also worked with architect D. Santiago Calatrava to construct two huge murals for the Palace of Arts Reina Sofia in Valencia. This dramatic performing arts space is truly stunning; check out their virtual tour and see if you can find the two murals inside.

But even with all these modern accolades, the artists at Ceramica Valenciana still stick to their traditional majolica methods. Pieces are all handmade and hand-painted, which gives every plate, bowl, jar, and vase a truly unique character. Archive footage from 1940 shows José Gimeno himself working on large pieces – check out this video (in Spanish) to see more for yourself. The film quality feels to me like a film noir, but covering Spanish ceramic production. (Fun fact: the factory in the film is the same building that Ceramica Valenciana still occupies today. I’ve been to visit 3 times and it is an old but absolutely stunning building housing endless amounts of ceramic masterpieces.)

http://video.google.es/videoplay?docid=3822281691113565574&hl=es

Even though technology has changed in so many ways, the methods to make these beautiful ceramics have remained the same for hundreds of years. Now that Ceramica Valenciana is almost back from vacation, I look forward to finalizing my order and being able to share their gorgeous Spanish ceramics with you in the near future. Here are a few of my favorite pieces to whet your appetite…

Images and video courtesy of La Cerámica Valenciana de José Gimeno.

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I’ve been in Mexico visiting artists like Gorky Gonzalez and can’t get enough of the sun, the food, the… roosters. From ceramic dishes to the blue and white rooster that stand alone, I’ve seen roosters (and other fowl) everywhere.

But it doesn’t end with blue and white rooster plates; that’s just the beginning. New triple dishes feature hummingbirds and roosters to join the cactus, palm tree, and fish motifs already in my Gorky collection. I love these ceramic dishes because they’re so versatile: good for dips, condiments, olives, or nuts, they also function as a place to keep jewelry, keys, or the contents of your pockets (no more lost wallets and phones for you!). With both double and triple ceramic dishes, use a variety to add spice to your next fiesta.

With the new black rooster plates from Italy, I’ve been struck at the global nature of animal motifs in ceramic wall art. Chickens, frogs, fish, and flamingos join butterflies (like the pottery dishes by Angélica Escarcega), flowers, and people for quirky and lively decorative plates and bowls. Visiting the artists let’s me not only stock up on popular pieces (like those fun salt and pepper shakers) but also see new ideas from ceramic wall plates to tibors (ginger jars). One of my favorite things is seeing the painted but unfired pottery dishes – the kiln totally transforms them from pale, flat ceramics into the glossy, touchable pieces we all love.

Watching the artists paint every piece is also incredible. Whether it’s geometric patterns or those blue and white roosters, plates, bowls, trays, and other dishes come alive with every brush stroke.

Whether you prefer monochrome or full color decorative plates, look for new arrivals from Gorky, Angélica, Capelo, and Talavera Vazquez in the next few months. There’ll be some old favorites and some new surprises with ceramic dishes that are truly works of art.

Want to see more of my Mexico adventures? “Like” Emilia Ceramics on Facebook for photos and updates.

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My love of Spanish pottery and fine Italian ceramics is long-standing and one of the reasons I began Emilia Ceramics. While living in Southern Spain, I saw gorgeous pieces of pottery (plates, cups, and bowls were only the beginning) being used everyday that were just as unique as the people using them. I realized that I couldn’t use all the pieces I thought were beautiful, but knew that there were others who would love them too. And thus Emilia Ceramics came into being.

Now my collection includes fine Italian ceramics, Tuscan pottery, as well as ceramics from France and Mexico. I’m excited because it looks like I’ll be adding Spanish pottery (by Ceramica Valenciana) to the Emilia Collection by the end of the summer (crossing my fingers about how shipping times work out). All these pieces emerge from the same roots and display similar techniques — resulting in majolica dinnerware and accessories that have distinctively “fat glazes,” vibrant colors, and unique designs that vary not only from region to region, but also from artist to artist.

But while I love these new pieces being produced today, what about vintage pottery? Collectors of Quimper, Fiestaware, majolica from Deruta and Faenza, as well as other fine Italian ceramics know what I’m talking about. A friend sent me a link to some Portuguese pottery she’d found made by SECLA (this espresso cup was my favorite piece) and it got me thinking about how designs and glazes have both changed and stayed the same for all these years. Just look at these Portuguese pottery tiles, ashtrays, and vases designed by Ferreira da Silva. Most of them are from the 1950s, yet their modern lines and fun designs could come out of an artist’s studio today.

That’s one of the reasons I love all kinds of pottery – they hold timeless appeal. Fine Italian ceramics become heirlooms, whether it’s a plate or a lamp. Majolica dinnerware graces the table for decades since its sturdy construction holds up quite nicely to the rigors of daily use. Not only does Tuscan, French, Mexican, and Spanish pottery look great, it’s functional and stylish. No wonder I keep finding artists whose pieces I love to add to the Emilia Collection!

Portuguese pottery image courtesy of R.Ferrao.

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Ginger jars are everywhere now and it’s not hard to see why. Called tibores in Mexico and sometimes referred to as urns in the U.S., these traditional ceramics are a stylish way to add visual interest to any space. The ginger jars by Talavera Vazquez are so popular that I’m often afraid of running out of stock. With the graphic stripes and zig zag chevrons, these are definitely pieces that look good in a variety of spaces.

Emilia Ceramics ginger jars are so popular, in fact, that I’m working with Talavera Vazquez to introduce some new colors (coming soon to the website). Look for neutral tones like gray and yellow zig-zags to join the existing cobalt blue, black, and burnt orange. I cannot wait to see the new ginger jars myself, let alone offer them to my customers in a wider color range.

Talking with the artists, I was reminded of when we began to work together to make the ginger jar table lamps. These bold ceramics are extremely popular and I think it’s because ginger jar table lamps combine style with function in an original way.

One of my favorite things about these pieces are how customizable they are. A blue and white ceramic lamp takes on a new look when paired with a large blue or small white shade (or anything in between). The shade brings personal style to the ceramic and makes for a truly personal statement.

The different patterns on these ginger jar lamps also create a variety of effects. The striking chevrons of this blue and white ginger jar lamp are bold and eye-catching. The blue and white striped ceramic lamp makes a softer graphic statement while smaller blue and white ginger jar lamp features organic motifs and a playful feel. Same color combination, three totally different blue and white ginger jar lamps that all bring sophistication to your home.

I love all the flexibility and fun that ginger jars and ginger jar lamps represent, whether it’s flanking a staircase, acting as a bedside lamp, or making a statement on the patio. So here’s to the new Vazquez ginger jar collection… coming soon!

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